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Wang Xinzhi y Michael Kolhaas, rebeldes en aras de su propia causa

John Page and Mariela Álvarez
Estudios de Asia y Africa
Vol. 20, No. 3 (65) (Jul. - Sep., 1985), pp. 408-423
Published by: El Colegio de Mexico
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40312903
Page Count: 16
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Wang Xinzhi y Michael Kolhaas, rebeldes en aras de su propia causa
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Abstract

In 1810 Heinrich von Kleist published the story of Michael Kolhaas taken "from an old chronicle" by Peter Hafftiz of events in the first half on the sixteenth century. In 1620 Feng Menlong published "How Wang Xinzhi's death saved his whole family" without revealing his source, but which has since been identified as a twelfth century chronicle by Yue Ke. The two stories offer striking parallels, not only in the manner of their conception, but in their content, characterization and structure, parallels made all the more fascinating by the absence of literary influence between the societies and writers that produced them but testifying anew to the world wide attraction of the rebel. In this article a comparison is made between the careers of the two heroes, Wang and Kolhaas pointing to their great similarities as well as their differences and it is the author's contention that they are both rebels sui generis in the social sense and literary archetypes hitherto ignored in the typology of the rebel in that they rebel only long enough to get the judicial vindication they are otherwise denied, even at the cost of their lives. It would be interesting to find any surviving contemporary official texts to substantiate many of the conclusions drawn from the more recent ones. With all the documents in hand, a rigorous comparative reading will reveal what it is that the fictor brings to history and what the historian can learn from fiction.

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