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Population Pressure and Climate as Dynamics within the Arctic Small Tool Tradition of Alaska

Bruce J. Lutz
Arctic Anthropology
Vol. 19, No. 2 (1982), pp. 143-149
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40316033
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Population Pressure and Climate as Dynamics within the Arctic Small Tool Tradition of Alaska
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Abstract

The dynamics of Arctic Small Tool tradition subsistence and settlement patterns result from the interaction of prey species' behavior and climatic conditions, as well as from the technological base of these prehistoric populations. It is suggested that climatic conditions during the sub-Atlantic episode had a differential effect on these populations. North of Bering Strait the netting of anadromous fish became untenable, while to the south land mammal hunting became more difficult and net fishing was increasingly relied upon. The behavioral responses of human groups to these conditions are discussed and the critical use of ethnographic analogy is recommended.

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