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Computational Thinking and Cognitive Hangovers

Yaroslav Senyshyn
Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education
No. 141, The 17th International Society for Music Education: ISME Research Seminar (Summer, 1999), pp. 135-138
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40318999
Page Count: 4
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Computational Thinking and Cognitive Hangovers
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Abstract

There is an ever growing pervasive anxiety among cognitivists to equate human thinking with artificial intelligence. The purpose of this paper is to argue the limits of reductionism vis-à-vis computational-algorithmic approaches to music education and computers. Thus Penrose 's thesis that the evocation of awareness as an appropriate physical action of the brain cannot be properly simulated computationally is supported by the author and his four paradoxical examples. The first paradox deals with a contradictory series of moments depending on unlimited factors of musical agogics that can never be determined because they depend on the indefinable for their very actualization. The second admits to the possibility of aesthetic simulation but not in terms of the "next something." The third paradox asks if there is such a thing as sight reading if the computer can do it as well? And the final paradox asks how can we reduce anxiety to predetermined notions of these very states if they are not predetermined in themselves? The author concludes that if educators do not recover from a cognitive hangover they may very well predetermine their selves to become ironically the vassals of computers in their futile obsession for determinacy and control.

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