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Recollections and Realities: Conversations with Student Music Teachers

Gordon Cox
Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education
No. 153/154, The 19th International Society for Music Education, ISME Research Seminar, Gothenburg, Sweden. School of Music, University of Gothenburg, August 3-9, 2002 (Summer - Fall, 2002), pp. 89-93
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40319146
Page Count: 5
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Recollections and Realities: Conversations with Student Music Teachers
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Abstract

This study is based upon tape-recorded interviews with ten student music teachers who were studying at the University of Reading. It attempts to relate recollections and stories concerning their family background, musical education, decisions to enter university to read music, career choice, and early experiences of teaching. Through reflecting upon such insights lies the intention that we might develop a more effective training programme. The findings included some of the following observations: students are frequently defensive about their home musical backgrounds; recollections of their own music teachers fell into the three categories of positive, ambivalent, and negative; their decisions to teach music were mixed, but could be divided broadly into those that were straightforward and committed and those that were provisional; initial experiences of teaching music were mixed, few accounts were unproblematic. Such group biographies should enable us to understand more fully the process of being a student music teacher, as well as the relationship of their personal experiences to such external forces as power, ideology and marginalisation which all effect the status of school subjects.

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