Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Rum, Seduction and Death: 'Aboriginality' and Alcohol

Marcia Langton
Oceania
Vol. 63, No. 3, The Politics of Representation and the Representation of Politics (Mar., 1993), pp. 195-206
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40331333
Page Count: 12
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Rum, Seduction and Death: 'Aboriginality' and Alcohol
Preview not available

Abstract

Racism is here examined in relation to its origins in the colonial culture and in the motivations and intents of the colonisers. It is contained in the metaphors and icons, onto which the stereotypical information is projected, which express fear and attempt to tame the native and turn him into a mendicant. Bennelong is shown as the first instance of the British constructing the image of the 'degenerate native' the 'drunken Aborigine' the 'urban Aborigine'. Whites are made innocent of the destruction of Aboriginal society because the Aborigines are 'drinking themselves to death'. This paper asks whether the notion of social pathology has allowed anthropologists to avoid dealing with the realities of Aboriginal social life.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206