Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Big Barrens Region of Kentucky and Tennessee: Further Observations and Considerations

Jerry M. Baskin, Carol C. Baskin and Edward W. Chester
Castanea
Vol. 59, No. 3 (Sep., 1994), pp. 226-254
Published by: Allen Press on behalf of the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4033696
Page Count: 29
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($36.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Big Barrens Region of Kentucky and Tennessee: Further Observations and Considerations
Preview not available

Abstract

A wide variety of landtype associations (sensu Smalley 1980) occurs on the Mississippian limestone karst plain of Kentucky and Tennessee. Thus, although much of this region is in agriculture, it supports a diversity of native plant communities. These include limestone cedar glades (edaphic climax communities on nearly flat areas of limestone bedrock and shallow soil dominated by annual or perennial forbs, annual grasses, cryptogams, or some combination of these); xeric limestone prairies of anthropogenic origin dominated by native perennial grasses and/or forbs; barrens (deep-soil, culturally-derived and maintained grasslands dominated by native perennial grasses); forests of dry, mesic, and wetland sites; and aquatic vegetation of sinkhole ponds. The historical occurrence of extensive areas of grassland interspersed with stunted trees and shrubs ("barrens") on the Kentucky Karst Plain is well documented. Transeau included these Big Barrens on his original (1935) and revised (1956) maps of the Prairie Peninsula, implying that they were formed during the Hypsithermal Interval of the Holocene, and this idea generally has been accepted by plant ecologists and geographers. However, after reviewing the literature, we previously concluded that the Big Barrens came into existence as a result of burning of forests by Native Americans in pre-European settlement times, and thus should not be considered part of Transeau's Prairie Peninsula. Additional evidence from the literature, on paleovegetation, paleoclimate, and plant and animal geography, further confirms our earlier conclusion that the Big Barrens are not an outlier of the Midwestern Tallgrass Prairie.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
250
    250
  • Thumbnail: Page 
251
    251
  • Thumbnail: Page 
252
    252
  • Thumbnail: Page 
253
    253
  • Thumbnail: Page 
254
    254