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Animal Emotions

Beth Dixon
Ethics and the Environment
Vol. 6, No. 2 (Autumn, 2001), pp. 22-30
Published by: Indiana University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40339011
Page Count: 9
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Animal Emotions
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Abstract

Recent work in the area of ethics and animals suggests that it is philosophically legitimate to ascribe emotions to nonhuman animals. Furthermore, it is sometimes argued that emotionality is a morally relevant psychological state shared by humans and nonhumans. What is missing from the philosophical literature that makes reference to emotions in nonhuman animals is an attempt to clarify and defend some particular account of the nature of emotion, and the role that emotions play in a characterization of human nature. I argue in this paper that some analyses of emotion are more credible than others. Because this is so, the thesis that humans and nonhumans share emotions may well be a more difficult case to make than has been recognized thus far.

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