Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Mitigating Impacts to Michaux's Sumac (Rhus michauxii Sarg.): A Case Study of Transplanting an Endangered Shrub

Richard Braham, Christopher Murray and Marjorie Boyer
Castanea
Vol. 71, No. 4 (Dec., 2006), pp. 265-271
Published by: Allen Press on behalf of the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4034217
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($36.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Mitigating Impacts to Michaux's Sumac (Rhus michauxii Sarg.): A Case Study of Transplanting an Endangered Shrub
Preview not available

Abstract

As part of a mitigation plan, we transplanted a clone of the endangered Michaux's sumac (Rhus michauxii) from an imperiled site to two lightly-forested sites. Using hand trowels, we removed 96 above-ground shoots with adjacent roots and 120 m of connecting root material. We wanted to determine whether Michaux's sumac can be successfully transplanted both from above-ground shoots with roots and from roots-only, whether direct out-planting or recovery in a greenhouse prior to out-planting provided higher survivorship, and whether transplanting is viable for mitigation. Planting above-ground shoots with roots and roots-only gave similar first-year survivorship both in the forest and in the greenhouse. Allowing plants to recover in a greenhouse prior to out-planting gave higher survivorship after one year. After 7-8 years, the number of above-ground shoots at the two sites increased to 203 and 262, an increase of 37 and 219% respectively, indicating that transplanting is a viable option for mitigation.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271