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Higher Rate of Culture-Confirmed "Campylobacter" Infections in Australia than in the USA: Is This Due to Differences in Healthcare-Seeking Behaviour or Stool Culture Frequency?

H. Vally, G. Hall, E. Scallan, M. D. Kirk and F. J. Angulo
Epidemiology and Infection
Vol. 137, No. 12 (Dec., 2009), pp. 1751-1758
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40390510
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Higher Rate of Culture-Confirmed "Campylobacter" Infections in Australia than in the USA: Is This Due to Differences in Healthcare-Seeking Behaviour or Stool Culture Frequency?
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Abstract

Laboratory-based surveillance by OzFoodNet in Australia and FoodNet in the USA indicated that the incidence of Campylobacter infections in 2001 in Australia was about nine times higher than in the USA. We assessed whether this disparity could be explained by différences in the frequency of stool culturing. Using data from population surveys of diarrhoea and symptom profiles for Campylobacter from case-control studies, indices of healthcare behaviour taking into account the severity of Campylobacter infections were calculated. These suggest that culture-confirmed Campylobacter infections underestimate the incidence of community cases by similar ratios in the two countries. The incidence of Campylobacter infections in Australia was about 12 times higher than in the USA after considération of healthcare System differences.

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