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Chemical versus Mechanical Fallow of Abandoned Croplands

A. C. Everson, D. N. Hyder, H. R. Gardner and R. E. Bement
Weed Science
Vol. 17, No. 4 (Oct., 1969), pp. 548-551
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4041307
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Chemical versus Mechanical Fallow of Abandoned Croplands
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Abstract

Chemical fallow with 2,2-dichloropropionic acid (dalapon) reduced the yield of non-seeded perennials more than mechanical fallow with sweep blades in the year of treatment. However, plants derived from seed left at the soil surface resulted in greater yields of nonseeded perennials on chemical than on mechanical-fallow plots the year following treatment. Each fallow method increased annual herbage yields the year after treatment as compared with directly-seeded plots. Litter was greatly reduced in the year of and in the year after mechanical fallow. However, the amount of litter on the chemical fallow plots was very high in the year of treatment and declined in the succeeding year. Success of seeding crested wheat-grass [Agropyron desertorum (Fisch, ex Link) Schult.] was slightly better after mechanical than after chemical fallow. Yield of crested wheatgrass in the year after planting was about the same for the mechanical fallow and the higher rate (10 lb/A) of dalapon. There was more available soil moisture to a depth of 30 inches in fallowed than in non-treated plots; but the small amount of moisture saved by fallow probably is immaterial to seeding success.

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