Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Selectivity of Linuron on Tomato and Parsnip

E. J. Hogue and G. F. Warren
Weed Science
Vol. 16, No. 1 (Jan., 1968), pp. 51-54
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4041371
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Selectivity of Linuron on Tomato and Parsnip
Preview not available

Abstract

In a study of the selective action of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea (linuron), parsnip (Pastinaca sativa L., var. Harris Model) possessed a high degree of tolerance as compared to tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill., var. Kokomo). Linuron was readily taken up by the roots of tomato and distributed throughout the plant, but it remained mostly in the roots of parsnip. Linuron in the leaves of parsnip was metabolized, to a great extent, while very little of the metabolite (s) was found in tomato. The herbicide caused rapid and complete inhibition of photosynthesis in tomato, and the plants never recovered. Photosynthesis in parsnip was inhibited but only temporarily. Therefore, it appears that the selectivity of linuron on these two species may be explained by the two mechanisms of differential accumulation in the foliage and metabolism of the herbicide.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54