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The Interactions of Soil-Borne Microorganisms and DCPA

B. G. Tweedy, Nikki Turner and Miriam Achituv
Weed Science
Vol. 16, No. 4 (Oct., 1968), pp. 470-473
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4041577
Page Count: 4
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The Interactions of Soil-Borne Microorganisms and DCPA
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Abstract

Soil samples with and without a past history of dimethyl-2,3,5,6-tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA) treatment were obtained from New York. A third sample was obtained from a field in Colorado where DCPA had been ineffective as a herbicide. The populations of bacteria and actinomycetes in these soils were determined and the actinomycetes were more prevalent in the samples with previous DCPA treatment than in untreated samples. Subsequent treatment resulted in an increase in actinomycete population and little change in bacterial population. In pure culture and in soils, the addition of DCPA had no adverse effect upon microbial growth, and several microorganisms appeared to utilize the herbicide as a carbon source. Two degradation products were methyl-2,3,5,6-tetra-chloroterephthalate and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloroterethalic acid.

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