Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Control of Purple Nutsedge with Bensulide

W. Powell Anderson and Max P. Dunford
Weed Science
Vol. 18, No. 3 (May, 1970), pp. 338-340
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4041607
Page Count: 3
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Control of Purple Nutsedge with Bensulide
Preview not available

Abstract

Soil incorporated into the tuber zone of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L.) at 1 to 9 kg/ha, O,O-diisoproyl phosphorodithioate S-ester with N-(2-mercaptoethyl)benzenesulfonamide (bensulide) inhibited the growth of roots on plants developing from these tubers. The inhibitory effect was temporary and occurred only when bensulide was in intimate contact with the tubers and developing plants. When tubers were removed from bensulide-treated soil, washed, and replanted in untreated soil, root growth was normal. The production of shoots from tubers planted in bensulide-treated soil apparently was not affected, but shoot-growth was retarded when root growth was suppressed. When bensulide was incorporated into the upper 5-cm layer of soil, the shoots of nutsedge plants developing from tubers located below this layer grew through the treated soil with no adverse effect; the roots of these plants developed from basal bulbs below the layer of treated soil and were normal. Leaching bensulide-treated soil with 37.6 hectarecm of water did not move enough bensulide into the soil to cause inhibitory growth effects on purple nutsedge.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340