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Translocation and Degradation of Bromoxynil in a Resistant and a Susceptible Species

D. E. Schafer and D. O. Chilcote
Weed Science
Vol. 18, No. 6 (Nov., 1970), pp. 729-732
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4041643
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Translocation and Degradation of Bromoxynil in a Resistant and a Susceptible Species
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Abstract

The relation of translocation and degradation to selectivity of 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzonitrile (bromoxynil) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. Nugaines), a resistant species, and coast fiddleneck (Amsinckia intermedia Fisch. & Mey.), a susceptible species, was examined. Radioautographic and extraction analysis revealed that the label from ¹⁴C-bromoxynil was more mobile in coast fiddleneck than in wheat. Higher levels of soluble radioactivity were found in extracts of coast fiddleneck than wheat. Higher levels of insoluble label were found in tissue residues of wheat than coast fiddleneck. In both species, most of the activity remained in treated leaves. A high percentage of the soluble activity was attributed to ¹⁴C-bromoxynil in both wheat and coast fiddleneck. The evolution of ¹⁴CO₂ by wheat treated with ¹⁴C-bromoxynil significantly exceeded that of coast fiddleneck. The difference in susceptibility between winter wheat and coast fiddleneck appears to be explained partly by differential translocation and degradation of bromoxynil.

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