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Control of Egyptian Broomrape (Orobanche aegyptiaca) and Other Weeds by Means of Solar Heating of the Soil by Polyethylene Mulching

R. Jacobsohn, A. Greenberger, J. Katan, M. Levi and H. Alon
Weed Science
Vol. 28, No. 3 (May, 1980), pp. 312-316
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4043362
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Control of Egyptian Broomrape (Orobanche aegyptiaca) and Other Weeds by Means of Solar Heating of the Soil by Polyethylene Mulching
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Abstract

Mulching the soil with polyethylene sheets before sowing during the hot season, increased the soil temperatures, which resulted in the control of soil-borne pathogens and weeds. This method was tested in a field heavily infested with Egyptian broomrape (Orobanche aegyptiaca L.). Soil was irrigated and mulched for 36 days during August-September 1977, prior to sowing carrot (Daucus carota L. 'Nantes Tip Top') seeds. Mulching increased soil temperatures by 8 to 12 C, up to 56 C in the top 5 cm. In the non-mulched plots the carrot plants became stunted due to heavy parasitization with broomrape and they were completely destroyed by the end of the season. In contrast, broomrape and other weeds were controlled in the mulched plots and the carrot plants grew normally. This effect was less pronounced in the border rows of the mulched plots. Mulching also greatly reduced the infestation of other weeds. Egyptian broomrape was also controlled in two other field experiments with carrots and eggplants (Solanum melongena L. 'Black oval'). As compared with fumigation, this new method of control is economical, simple, nonhazardous, and does not employ toxic materials.

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