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Genetic Uniformity in an Introduced Population of Witchweed (Striga asiatica) in the United States

Charles R. Werth, James L. Riopel and Nan W. Gillespie
Weed Science
Vol. 32, No. 5 (Sep., 1984), pp. 645-648
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4043983
Page Count: 4
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Genetic Uniformity in an Introduced Population of Witchweed (Striga asiatica) in the United States
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Abstract

Witchweed, [Striga asiatica (L.) Kuntze⁵ STRLU], an important parasitic weed throughout much of the old world, occurs as a recent (30 yr) introduction in a limited region in North and South Carolina. Reproduction in this population has been shown to occur primarily through self-pollination of flowers. Genetic diversity in two populations from this region was assessed, utilizing starch gel electrophoresis and staining of enzymes. An average of 64 individuals was observed to be monomorphic at an estimated minimum of 32 genetic loci coding 18 enzyme systems. This lack of polymorphism is attributable to the probable founding of the population by one or a few individuals coupled with the predominantly autogamous breeding system.

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