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Growth and Reproductive Characteristics of Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) Biotypes

Francis P. Degennaro and Stephen C. Weller
Weed Science
Vol. 32, No. 4 (Jul., 1984), pp. 525-528
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4044016
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Growth and Reproductive Characteristics of Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) Biotypes
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Abstract

Five presumed biotypes were identified among field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L. # CONAR) clones collected from a field population near Lafayette, IN. Consistent variations in leaf morphology, floral characteristics, and accumulation of shoot and root biomass were found between biotypes when grown in a controlled environment. The biotypes also differed in their flowering capacity. The earliest flowering biotype formed flowers 23 days before the latest and produced 19 times more flowers per plant, which indicated further differences in seed production potential between biotypes. Pollination studies helped to differentiate biotypes within the population and showed that the presumed biotypes were self-incompatible. Vegetative reproduction potential of the biotypes varied from 1.8 to 74.5% in the number of root buds that developed into shoots. The variability in growth and reproduction observed between these field bindweed biotypes may explain the survival and adaptability of a population of this weed as environmental conditions and control practices change.

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