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Crop Losses in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) as Determined Using Weeded and Nonweeded Quadrats

Larry Hume
Weed Science
Vol. 33, No. 5 (Sep., 1985), pp. 734-740
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4044082
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Crop Losses in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) as Determined Using Weeded and Nonweeded Quadrats
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Abstract

The importance of including crop density in studies of weed-wheat competition and in making estimates of crop losses due to weeds was demonstrated. Wheat density in adjacent quadrats of 1 m² varied by an average of 25 plants in the farm fields and research plots examined. Differences between adjacent quadrats were in the same range for fields sown with different implements. Yield per plant, dry weight per plant, and tillering per plant decreased with increasing wheat density. For weed-crop competition studies in small-grain crops, the yields of weed-free and weedy quadrats are normally compared to estimate crop loss caused by competition. It was demonstrated that such estimates can be highly distorted if crop density is not taken into account. Current procedures used widely in agronomic competition studies are inadequate to properly define the relationship between crops and weeds. A more accurate method for performing such investigations is described in which both weed and crop abundance are determined. These variables are related to crop loss using multiple regression.

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