Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Growth and Morphological Characteristics of Red Rice (Oryza sativa) Biotypes

Amadou Diarra, Roy J. Smith, Jr. and Ronald E. Talbert
Weed Science
Vol. 33, No. 3 (May, 1985), pp. 310-314
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4044264
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Growth and Morphological Characteristics of Red Rice (Oryza sativa) Biotypes
Preview not available

Abstract

Pot experiments were conducted in the field at Stuttgart, AR, during 1982 and 1983 to evaluate growth and morphological differences between strawhull and blackhull red rice (Oryza sativa L. # ORYSA) biotypes collected from Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas. All red rice biotypes were compared with rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars 'Lebonnet' and 'Nortai'. Growth and morphological differences were greatest between cultivars and red rice biotypes, less between blackhull and strawhull types, and least among collections within blackhull or strawhull. Cultivars emerged slower, were shorter, tillered less, produced less straw and fewer panicles/plant, had a lower leaf area index, and had less grain shattering than most of the red rice biotypes. Blackhull red rice biotypes tillered 27% more, produced 18% more straw, and had later maturity than strawhull. Blackhull red rice from Arkansas emerged earlier, tillered 6 to 38% more, and produced 8 to 38% more panicles per plant than other red rice biotypes, whereas blackhull red rice from Texas was 11 to 26% taller at maturity than other biotypes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
310
    310
  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314