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Influence of Mulch, Tillage, and Diphenamid on Weed Control, Yield, and Quality in No-Till Flue-Cured Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

Donn G. Shilling, A. Douglas Worsham and David A. Danehower
Weed Science
Vol. 34, No. 5 (Sep., 1986), pp. 738-744
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4044425
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Influence of Mulch, Tillage, and Diphenamid on Weed Control, Yield, and Quality in No-Till Flue-Cured Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)
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Abstract

Field experiments were conducted to determine the effects of various densities of four fall-seeded small grain mulches and diphenamid (N,N-dimethyl-α-phenyl benzeneacetamide) on weed control, yield, and quality in no-till flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. 'McNair 944'). A greenhouse study investigated the effects of non-soil-incorporated mulch from the same small grains plus alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) on various growth parameters of tobacco ('Speight G-70'). None of the mulches used in the greenhouse study adversely affected growth of the tobacco. Mulch from rye (Secale cereale L. 'Abruzzi') killed about 2 weeks before transplanting plus diphenamid provided better annual broadleaf weed control (85%) than wheat (Triticum aestivum L. 'McNair'), barley (Hordeum vulgare L. 'Keowee'), and no mulch. Oat (Avena sativa L. 'Brooks') mulch resulted in 80% broadleaf weed control. There were no differences in annual grass control (which was short lived) among mulches but control was lower in the no-mulch treatment. Rye mulch resulted in a 22% increase in the control of broadleaf weeds compared to no-mulch. Yield of the no-till tobacco did not differ among mulches and averaged 82% of that conventionally grown. The quality was not affected. The rye mulch did not affect the yield or quality of tobacco when compared to a nonmulch, noncultivated treatment. The 18% decrease in the no-till yield was apparently the result of the lack of tillage and increased weed interference and was not due to adverse effects from the rye.

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