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Distribution of Triazine-Resistant Smooth Pigweed (Amaranthus hybridus) and Common Lambsquarters (Chenopodium album) in Virginia

William K. Vencill and Chester L. Foy
Weed Science
Vol. 36, No. 4 (Jul., 1988), pp. 497-499
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4044673
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Distribution of Triazine-Resistant Smooth Pigweed (Amaranthus hybridus) and Common Lambsquarters (Chenopodium album) in Virginia
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Abstract

The distribution pattern of s-triazine-resistant biotypes of common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. # CHEAL) and smooth pigweed (Amaranthus hybridus L. # AMACH) in Virginia was determined. Seeds were collected from suspected triazine-resistant biotypes of both species. Triazine resistance was confirmed by measuring chlorophyll fluoroscence in the presence of atrazine [6-chloro-N-ethyl-N′-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine]. Greenhouse bioassay with whole-plant material and a sinking leaf disc assay were also performed as further confirmation of triazine resistance. Triazine-resistant smooth pigweed was confirmed in 19 counties and common lambsquarters in eight counties in Virginia. Triazine-resistant smooth pigweed and common lambsquarters were located mostly in the northern and southwestern highlands of the state where there has been a long history of triazine use in no-till corn (Zea mays L.) production. S-triazine-resistant biotypes were also cross-resistant to other representative s-triazine and as-triazine herbicides but susceptible to the substituted urea herbicide diuron [N′-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N,N-dimethylurea].

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