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Evidence That Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Is Allelopathic to Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus)

Howard F. Harrison, Jr. and Joseph K. Peterson
Weed Science
Vol. 39, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 1991), pp. 308-312
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4044934
Page Count: 5
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Evidence That Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Is Allelopathic to Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus)
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Abstract

In field studies, 'Regal' sweet potato greatly reduced yellow nutsedge growth when the two species were grown together using standard cultural practices. At the end of the growing season, yellow nutsedge shoot dry weight per m² in plots where the two species were planted together was less than 10% of shoot weight in plots where nutsedge was grown alone. Presence of yellow nutsedge did not markedly affect sweet potato growth. When grown together in a greenhouse experiment designed to minimize the competitive effects of sweet potato on yellow nutsedge, yellow nutsedge growth was reduced more than 50% by sweet potato 8 and 12 weeks after planting. The most polar fraction of serially extracted sweet potato periderm tissue was highly inhibitory to yellow nutsedge root growth. These results indicate that sweet potato interference with yellow nutsedge under field conditions is partially due to allelopathy.

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