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Impact of Agronomic Practices on Weed Communities: Tillage Systems

Douglas A. Derksen, Guy P. Lafond, A. Gordon Thomas, Heather A. Loeppky and Clarence J. Swanton
Weed Science
Vol. 41, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1993), pp. 409-417
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4045367
Page Count: 9
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Impact of Agronomic Practices on Weed Communities: Tillage Systems
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Abstract

Adverse changes in weed communities are a limiting factor for the adoption of conservation tillage practices. Predictions of an increased association of annual and perennial grasses, perennial dicot weeds, wind-disseminated species, and volunteer crops as weeds, and decreased association of annual dicot weeds in reduced-tillage systems were tested. Field experiments involving zero-, minimum-, and conventional-tillage systems were conducted in Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1990 at Ituna and Waldron, and from 1986 to 1988 at Tadmore. Weed community composition was analyzed for years 1988 to 1990 by canonical discriminant analysis. An increased association of perennial and annual grasses with zero tillage did not generally occur. Wind-dispersed species and volunteer crops were associated with reduced tillage and summer annual dicots with conventional tillage, but exceptions occurred. Species responded differently among sites or within a site over time. Within the time frame of this research, changes in weed communities were influenced more by location and year than by tillage systems, indicating fluctuational rather than directional or consistent changes in community composition.

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