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Principles in the Classification, the Marriages, and Some Other Relations of a Community of Balinese on Lombok

Andrew Duff-Cooper
Anthropos
Bd. 79, H. 4./6. (1984), pp. 485-503
Published by: Anthropos Institut
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40461871
Page Count: 19
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Principles in the Classification, the Marriages, and Some Other Relations of a Community of Balinese on Lombok
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Abstract

This essay follows Hocart's precept that the best way to understand alien and exotic institutions is to concentrate upon the terms used by the people themselves. The terminology of relationship employed by villagers in Baturujung, western Lombok, is presented. Its form is shown to express relations of closeness and of distance to kawitan "origin-points" of which any empirical individual has an indeterminate number. The terms express the constancy of atman, the animator or "soul" of Balinese individuals (and much more besides). Kawitan in the form of a male and a female with children are centred on houses in compounds. The lives of villagers are focussed on these houses, in accordance with the terminology. Attitudes associated with individuals similarly follow the ideas of closeness and of distance. Different types of marriage are considered, as are marriages which are best not contracted by villagers, further, three ways in which people obtain rice. The exchanges involved in these "economic" relations are based on three principles: duality, complementarity, and equality, at a high level of abstraction, being discernible also in the marriages which are best contracted by villagers. Consideration of marriages in terms of these principles removes anomaly from the types of marriage villagers consider to be harmonious unions. The holism of Balinese society, expressed in Balinese metaphysics, is apparent in the way in which such seemingly disparate areas of social life as the terminology and marriage and "economic" relations may be usefully considered together.

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