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The Maroon Republics and Religious Diversity in Colonial Haiti

Leslie G. Desmangles
Anthropos
Bd. 85, H. 4./6. (1990), pp. 475-482
Published by: Anthropos Institut
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40463572
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Maroon Republics and Religious Diversity in Colonial Haiti
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Abstract

Anthropological literature about Vodou suggests that African religious traditions brought by the slaves remained intact throughout the colonial period in Haiti. This article presents two theses: first, the nature of the ethnic compositions of the Maroon republics throughout the island, new environmental factors, and the socio-political situation in the colony would have resulted in radical transformation of African traditions; second, culture contact between Africa and Europe in Haiti caused Vodou to incorporate Roman Catholic beliefs and practices in its theology. This subterfuge resulted in a religious symbiosis, the juxtaposition of religious beliefs and practices from two different continents.

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