Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Local Knowledge and Local Knowing. An Anthropological Analysis of Contested "Cultural Products' in the Context of Development

Christoph Antweiler
Anthropos
Bd. 93, H. 4./6. (1998), pp. 469-494
Published by: Anthropos Institut
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40464844
Page Count: 26
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Local Knowledge and Local Knowing. An Anthropological Analysis of Contested "Cultural Products' in the Context of Development
Preview not available

Abstract

This study shows systematically why local knowledge (often called indigenous knowledge) has a big developmental potential and why its utilization for development is ambiguous. Local knowledge consists of factual knowledge, skills, and capabilities, most of which have some empirical grounding. It is culturally situated and is best understood as a "social product." The practical application in the development context is less of a technological but a theoretical and political problem, what is shown here generally and by referring to forest-related knowledge. Local knowledge is instrumentalized and idealized by development experts as well as by their critics. But it does not necessarily present itself as a comprehensive knowledge system and activities based on local knowledge are not necessarily sustainable or socially just. The use of local knowledge for development should not be restricted to the extraction of information or applied simply as a countermodel to Western science.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[469]
    [469]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
470
    470
  • Thumbnail: Page 
471
    471
  • Thumbnail: Page 
472
    472
  • Thumbnail: Page 
473
    473
  • Thumbnail: Page 
474
    474
  • Thumbnail: Page 
475
    475
  • Thumbnail: Page 
476
    476
  • Thumbnail: Page 
477
    477
  • Thumbnail: Page 
478
    478
  • Thumbnail: Page 
479
    479
  • Thumbnail: Page 
480
    480
  • Thumbnail: Page 
481
    481
  • Thumbnail: Page 
482
    482
  • Thumbnail: Page 
483
    483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
484
    484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
486
    486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
487
    487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
488
    488
  • Thumbnail: Page 
489
    489
  • Thumbnail: Page 
490
    490
  • Thumbnail: Page 
491
    491
  • Thumbnail: Page 
492
    492
  • Thumbnail: Page 
493
    493
  • Thumbnail: Page 
494
    494
Part of Sustainability