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Charles Nodier and "Finnegans Wake"

J. Mitchell Morse
Comparative Literature Studies
Vol. 5, No. 2 (Jun., 1968), pp. 195-201
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40467749
Page Count: 7
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Charles Nodier and "Finnegans Wake"
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Abstract

Charles Nodier (1780-1844) analyzed his nightmares in a way that anticipated Freud. He thus discovered that he had an incestuous yearning for his daughter, and he exorcised his demons by putting them into dreamlike fictions. He lacked the technical skill to make these as dreamlike as Finnegans Wake; there is moreover no evidence that Joyce read Nodier; but there are remarkable correspondences between Nodier's theory and Joyce's achievement. What we have here is probably not the influence of one writer on another but the rediscovery of a literary principle. [J. M. M.]

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