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The Effects of Food Color on Perceived Flavor

Lawrence L. Garber, Jr., Eva M. Hyatt and Richard G. Starr, Jr.
Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice
Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall, 2000), pp. 59-72
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40470017
Page Count: 14
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The Effects of Food Color on Perceived Flavor
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Abstract

This research investigates the role that food color plays in conferring identity, meaning and liking to those foods and beverages that assume many flavor varieties. In a taste test experiment manipulating food color and label information, 389 undergraduates at a public university (53% male and 47% female; 79% between 18 and 21 years of age) were assigned the task of evaluating a successful brand of powdered fruit drink. Results from this study indicate that food color affects the consumer's ability to correctly identify flavor, to form distinct flavor proflles and preferences, and dominates other flavor information sources, including labeling and taste. Strategic alternatives for the effective deployment of food color for promotional purposes at the point of purchase are recommended.

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