If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

An Empirical Assessment of Salesperson Motivation, Commitment, and Job Outcomes

Thomas N. Ingram, Keun S. Lee and Steven J. Skinner
The Journal of Personal Selling and Sales Management
Vol. 9, No. 3 (Fall, 1989), pp. 25-33
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40471342
Page Count: 9
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
An Empirical Assessment of Salesperson Motivation, Commitment, and Job Outcomes
Preview not available

Abstract

This study contributes to the efforts to integrate work commitment constructs into the long-dominant expectancy theory framework of salesforce motivation and performance. Responses were gathered from 231 industrial salespeople in order to: 1) provide evidence concerning discriminant and convergent validity of two measures of work commitment and 2) distinguish expectancy and commitment constructs; and investigate the relationships between motivation, commitment, and two important outcomes—effort and performance. The results of the study indicate that conceptual and empirical differences do exist between commitment variables and expectancy-based motivation variables. Job commitment and extrinsic motivation are found to be related to salesperson effort, which in turn is related to salesperson performance.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33