Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Fatal Fungal Outbreak on Vancouver Island Is Characterized by Enhanced Intracellular Parasitism Driven by Mitochondrial Regulation

Hansong Ma, Ferry Hagen, Dov J. Stekel, Simon A. Johnston, Edward Sionov, Rama Falk, Itzhack Polacheck, Teun Boekhout, Robin C. May and Joan Wennstrom Bennett
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 106, No. 31 (Aug. 4, 2009), pp. 12980-12985
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40484636
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Fatal Fungal Outbreak on Vancouver Island Is Characterized by Enhanced Intracellular Parasitism Driven by Mitochondrial Regulation
Preview not available

Abstract

In 1999, the population of Vancouver Island, Canada, began to experience an outbreak of a fatal fungal disease caused by a highly virulent lineage of Cryptococcus gattii. This organism has recently spread to the Canadian mainland and Pacific Northwest, but the molecular cause of the outbreak remains unknown. Here we show that the Vancouver Island outbreak (VIO) isolates have dramatically increased their ability to replicate within macrophages of the mammalian immune system in comparison with other C gattii strains. We further demonstrate that such enhanced intracellular parasitism is directly linked to virulence in a murine model of cryptococcosis, suggesting that this phenotype may be the cause of the outbreak. Finally, microarray studies on 24 G gattii strains reveals that the hypervirulence of the VIO isolates is characterized by the up-regulation of a large group of genes, many of which are encoded by mitochondrial genome or associated with mitochondrial activities. This expression profile correlates with an unusual mitochondrial morphology exhibited by the VIO strains after phagocytosis. Our data thus demonstrate that the intracellular parasitism of macrophages is a key driver of a human disease outbreak, a finding that has significant implications for a wide range of other human pathogens.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[12980]
    [12980]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12981
    12981
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12982
    12982
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12983
    12983
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12984
    12984
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12985
    12985