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Large Eddy Simulation of the Atmosphere on Various Scales

M. J. P. Cullen and A. R. Brown
Philosophical Transactions: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Vol. 367, No. 1899, Applied Large Eddy Simulation (Jul. 28, 2009), pp. 2947-2956
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40485637
Page Count: 10
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Large Eddy Simulation of the Atmosphere on Various Scales
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Abstract

Numerical simulations of the atmosphere are routinely carried out on various scales for purposes ranging from weather forecasts for local areas a few hours ahead to forecasts of climate change over periods of hundreds of years. Almost without exception, these forecasts are made with space/time-averaged versions of the governing Navier-Stokes equations and laws of thermodynamics, together with additional terms representing internal and boundary forcing. The calculations are a form of large eddy modelling, because the subgrid-scale processes have to be modelled. In the global atmospheric models used for long-term predictions, the primary method is implicit large eddy modelling, using discretization to perform the averaging, supplemented by specialized subgrid models, where there is organized small-scale activity, such as in the lower boundary layer and near active convection. Smaller scale models used for local or shortrange forecasts can use a much smaller averaging scale. This allows some of the specialized subgrid models to be dropped in favour of direct simulations. In research mode, the same models can be run as a conventional large eddy simulation only a few orders of magnitude away from a direct simulation. These simulations can then be used in the development of the subgrid models for coarser resolution models.

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