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A Historical View of Woman in Music Education Careers

Sondra Wieland Howe
Philosophy of Music Education Review
Vol. 17, No. 2, Women and the Work of Music Education (Fall, 2009), pp. 162-183
Published by: Indiana University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40495498
Page Count: 22
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A Historical View of Woman in Music Education Careers
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Abstract

Women music educators in the USA have been active in public and private schools, churches, and community organizations. In the nineteenth century, Julia E. Crane founded the Crane Institute of Music, the first institution to train music supervisors; and women developed kindergarten programs throughout the US. In the "private sphere," women taught in home studios and Sunday schools, and published children's songs and hymns. In 1907, the Music Supervisors National Conference (which became the Music Educators National Conference) was founded under the leadership of Frances E. Clark, although only thirteen women have been president of MENC between 1907 and 2010. In the twentieth century, women have edited music textbook series and served on editorial boards of music education journals. This survey of nationally prominent music educators shows the importance of quality education, guiding personal philosophies, positive supportive mentors, and leadership opportunities within the profession for developing successful lifetime careers.

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