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Zur Typologie der Vergangenheitstempora in den Sprachen Europas (synthetische vs. analytische Bildungsweise)

Elmar Ternes
Zeitschrift für Dialektologie und Linguistik
55. Jahrg., H. 3 (1988), pp. 332-342
Published by: Franz Steiner Verlag
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40503085
Page Count: 11
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Zur Typologie der Vergangenheitstempora in den Sprachen Europas (synthetische vs. analytische Bildungsweise)
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Abstract

The past tenses systems of the European languages are investigated according to the criterion synthetic vs. analytic (e.g. NHG. ich sagte vs. ich habe gesagt). A clear shift from north to south is found: a northern area with mainly synthetic forms, a central area with mainly analytic forms and a southern area which also has synthetic forms. It is significant that the boundaries between these areas run right through areas where the same language is spoken and ignore national boundaries. The boundaries from east to west are not so clearly defined. Nevertheless the Slavic languages do show all the different varieties of this criterion. It should be noted that analytical forms can develop back into synthetic ones. From a diachronic point of view this criterion can be regarded as a cycle.

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