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GNOM-LIKE1/ERMO1 and SEC24a/ERMO2 Are Required for Maintenance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Morphology in Arabidopsis thaliana

Ryohei Thomas Nakano, Ryo Matsushima, Haruko Ueda, Kentaro Tamura, Tomoo Shimada, Lixin Li, Yasuko Hayashi, Maki Kondo, Mikio Nishimura and Ikuko Hara-Nishimura
The Plant Cell
Vol. 21, No. 11 (Nov., 2009), pp. 3672-3685
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40537538
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
GNOM-LIKE1/ERMO1 and SEC24a/ERMO2 Are Required for Maintenance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Morphology in Arabidopsis thaliana
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Abstract

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is composed of tubules, sheets, and three-way junctions, resulting in a highly conserved polygonal network in all eukaryotes. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the organization of these structures are obscure. To identify novel factors responsible for ER morphology, we employed a forward genetic approach using a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plant (GFP-h) with fluorescently labeled ER. We isolated two mutants with defects in ER morphology and designated them endoplasmic reticulum morphologyi (ermol] and ermo2. The cells of both mutants developed a number of ER-derived spherical bodies, ~ 1¼m in diameter, in addition to the typical polygonal network of ER. The spherical bodies were distributed throughout the ermol cells, while they formed a large aggregate in ermo2 cells. We identified the responsible gene for ermol to be GNOM-LIKE1 (GNL1) and the gene for ermo2 to be SEC24a. Homologs of both GNL1 and SEC24a are involved in membrane trafficking between the ER and Golgi in yeast and animal cells. Our findings, however, suggest that GNL1/ERMO1 and SEC24a/ERMO2 have a novel function in ER morphology in higher plants.

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