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Journal Article

A Non-Trophic Interaction Chain Links Predators in Different Spatial Niches

Renée P. Prasad and William E. Snyder
Oecologia
Vol. 162, No. 3 (Mar., 2010), pp. 747-753
Published by: Springer in cooperation with International Association for Ecology
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40540212
Page Count: 7

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Topics: Beetles, Eggs, Trophic relationships, Predators, Species, Ecology, Synecology, Leaves, Foraging, Flies
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A Non-Trophic Interaction Chain Links Predators in Different Spatial Niches
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Abstract

Non-trophic interactions, driven by one species changing the behavior but not density of another species, appear to be as pervasive as those involving consumption. However, ecologists have only begun to explore nontrophic interactions in species-rich communities. We investigated interactions within a community including two predator-prey linkages separated in space: ground-active predatory beetles and their fly egg prey on the ground, and lady beetles and their aphid prey in plant foliage. In field and greenhouse experiments we found that ground-active predators preyed heavily on fly eggs except when both aphids and lady beetles were present. The aphids drop from the foliage to escape foraging lady beetles, and once on the ground apparently triggered ground-active predators to switch from attacking fly eggs to attacking aphids. This suggests that the first non-trophic interaction in the foliage, mediated by aphid antipredator behavior, in turn initiated and accentuated a second non-trophic interaction on the ground, mediated by prey-switching behavior by ground predators. Our results demonstrate that successive nontrophic interactions can be propagated along chains of more than three species, and can serve to link species that are otherwise spatially isolated.

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