Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Meatpacking And Its Social And Economic Consequences For Garden City, Kansas In The 1980s

Michael Broadway
Urban Anthropology and Studies of Cultural Systems and World Economic Development
Vol. 19, No. 4, When the Packers Came to Town: Changing Ethnic Relations in Garden City, Kansas (WINTER, 1990), pp. 321-344
Published by: The Institute, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40553190
Page Count: 24
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Meatpacking And Its Social And Economic Consequences For Garden City, Kansas In The 1980s
Preview not available

Abstract

Manufacturing within the U.S. has increasingly been attracted to nonmetropolitan areas. This process began on a large scale during the 1960s. The meatpacking industry is representative of this national trend, since over the past forty years it has been transformed from an urban to rural based industry. Southwestern Kansas, and in particular Finney County, have been among the principal beneficiaries of this process. During the 1980s Finney County experienced rapid population growth as a result of the opening of two large beefpacking plants. The construction of these plants, their subsequent operation and associated multiplier effect led Finney County's population to increase by 33 percent during the 1980-86 period. Much of this growth was attributable to the inmigration of Southeast Asian refugees, Hispanics and Anglos. Previous studies of manufacturing growth in rural areas have focused largely upon economic considerations and ignored the social consequences. This paper considers both the economic and social changes that occurred in Garden City and Finney County in general as a result of the opening of two beefpacking plants. Employment growth in meatpacking led to the creation of jobs in the service sector, while the community responded to the rapid growth by the provision of new infrastructure. However, more complex problems also emerged; these include a rising crime rate, an increase in the rate of various social disorders and the provision of services for non-English speaking migrants in an isolated rural area.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
321
    321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
322
    322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
323
    323
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
325
    325
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326
  • Thumbnail: Page 
327
    327
  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329
  • Thumbnail: Page 
330
    330
  • Thumbnail: Page 
331
    331
  • Thumbnail: Page 
332
    332
  • Thumbnail: Page 
333
    333
  • Thumbnail: Page 
334
    334
  • Thumbnail: Page 
335
    335
  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341
  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342
  • Thumbnail: Page 
343
    343
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344