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Troubled Water: Ethnodevelopment, Natural Resource Commodification, And Neoliberalism In Andean Peru

Emily J. Hogue and Pilar Rau
Urban Anthropology and Studies of Cultural Systems and World Economic Development
Vol. 37, No. 3/4, Neoliberalism and Ethno-Development in Latin America (FALL AND WINTER, 2008), pp. 283-327
Published by: The Institute, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40553411
Page Count: 45
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Troubled Water: Ethnodevelopment, Natural Resource Commodification, And Neoliberalism In Andean Peru
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Abstract

This paper examines how ethnic identities, ethnic-based alliances, and a framework for ethnodevelopment are emerging in contrast and resistance to the neoliberal commodification of natural resources in Andean communities in Peru. Using the context of a struggle over water rights between community members and foreign proponents of a hydroelectric plant in the district of Combapata, Peru, we explore how a cultural connection to the land has facilitated a framework for ethnodevelopment and intensified ethnic identity. In the last several decades throughout Latin America, the generation and shaping of indigenous ethnic identities has taken center stage as a phenomenon of great social and political significance, but Peru has posed a fascinating anomalyfor indigenous ethnic history in the Americas due to the weak state of its indigenous organizations. Based on five months of qualitative research in Combapata, this study explores what recent developments in ethnic identity, ethnic-based alliances, and indigenousled development mean for Peru's campesino populations and for ethnodevelopment in Latin America.

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