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Journal Article

Confirmation and Resistance Mechanisms in Glyphosate-Resistant Common Ragweed ( Ambrosia artemisiifolia ) in Arkansas

Chad E. Brewer and Lawrence R. Oliver
Weed Science
Vol. 57, No. 6 (November-December 2009), pp. 567-573
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40586874
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Confirmation and Resistance Mechanisms in Glyphosate-Resistant Common Ragweed (
              Ambrosia artemisiifolia
              ) in Arkansas
Preview not available

Abstract

Greenhouse studies were established in Fayetteville, AR, to investigate glyphosate resistance in Arkansas common ragweed populations. Common ragweed seed were collected from plants in Pope and Jackson counties in Arkansas. Plants grown from seed were sprayed with one of seven glyphosate rates. Populations in Pope and Jackson counties were 21-fold and 10-fold more tolerant to glyphosate, respectively, than a known susceptible population. Based on ¹₄C-glyphosate absorption and translocation studies, reduced glyphosate absorption or translocation was not the resistance mechanism in Arkansas glyphosate-resistant common ragweed. Shikimate accumulation did not differ among the known susceptible and the two resistant populations at 3 d after treatment (DAT). However, by 5 DAT, shikimate accumulation in the two resistant populations was lower than the known susceptible population. Data indicate that glyphosate-resistant common ragweed is present in at least two locations in Arkansas, and the resistance mechanism is not an insensitive target site or reduced glyphosate absorption or translocation.

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