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ACTIVITY PATTERNS OF TWO SYMPATRIC SPECIES OF SKUNKS ( MEPHITIS MEPHITIS AND SPILOGALE GRACILIS ) IN TEXAS

Sean A. Neiswenter, Robert C. Dowler and John H. Young
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 55, No. 1 (MARCH 2010), pp. 16-21
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40588599
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
ACTIVITY PATTERNS OF TWO SYMPATRIC SPECIES OF SKUNKS ( MEPHITIS MEPHITIS AND SPILOGALE GRACILIS ) IN TEXAS
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Abstract

We used radiotelemetry to document and compare activity and movement between the western spotted skunk Spibgale gradlis, and the striped skunk Mephitis mephitis in Texas. Mephitis mephitis had a higher rate of movement than S. gradas. Both species had highest rates of movement during autumn, coinciding with dispersal of young. With the exception of summer, M. mephitis was significantly more active than S. gradlis and generally took shorter breaks during nightly activity. We documented statistical differences in activity between species for all seasons. Highest activity of one species occurred during lowest activity of the other species, which may indicate avoidance of the larger more-dominant species, M. mephitis, by S. gracilis. Utilizamos datos de telemetria para documentar y comparar la actividad y el movimiento entre el zorrillo manchado occidental Spilogale gracilis y el zorrillo rayado Mephitis mephitis en Texas, USA. Mephitis mephitis tuvo un índice de movimiento más alto que S. gracilis. Ambas especies tuvieron la taza de movimiento más alta durante el otoño, coincidiendo con la dispersión de crías. Con la excepción del verano, M. mephitis estuvo significativamente más activo que S. gracilis y generalmente tomó descansos más cortos durante la actividad nocturna. Documentamos diferencias estadísticas en la actividad entre las especies en todas las estaciones del año. La alta actividad de una especie ocurrió durante la baja actividad de la otra especie, lo que puede indicar que S. gracilis evita a la especie más grande y dominante, M. mephitis.

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