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The Trials of Job and Kafka's Josef K.

Stuart Lasine
The German Quarterly
Vol. 63, No. 2, Focus: Jews and Germans/Jewish-German Literature (Spring, 1990), pp. 187-198
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Association of Teachers of German
DOI: 10.2307/406344
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/406344
Page Count: 12
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The Trials of Job and Kafka's Josef K.
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Abstract

Previous comparisons between Der Prozess and the Book of Job have not adequately noted the presence of technical legal terminology in the works or the way in which the trial metaphor leads readers to play the role of juror. Moreover, they have wrongly accepted K.'s perception of the court as corrupt and of himself as victim. While Job may truly be a scapegoat, K. merely adopts that pose to evade personal responsibility. It is actually the court that embodies the values of Job and of Biblical law. The court gives K. the opportunity for a moral metamorphosis by trying him in the manner of the Biblical God.

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