Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Fossil Evidence from Fish House Clays for the Origin and Changes in Species Composition through Time of the Northern Atlantic Slope Unionid Fauna (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

Pieter W. Kat
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia
Vol. 135 (1983), pp. 85-101
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4064797
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Fossil Evidence from Fish House Clays for the Origin and Changes in Species Composition through Time of the Northern Atlantic Slope Unionid Fauna (Mollusca: Bivalvia)
Preview not available

Abstract

Pre-Wisconsinan unionid fossils within the Fish House clays near Camden, New Jersey, reveal the existence of a fauna composed of ten species. Three of these species are now found only among the Interior Basin unionid fauna, another species is now restricted to a smaller geographic range, and two anodontine species now hybridize where their newly-expanded ranges overlap. The Fish House fossils constitute the only described Pleistocene unionid fauna of the northern Atlantic Slope, and the existence of Interior Basin taxa within this fauna supports hypotheses concerning an Interior Basin origin of certain Atlantic Slope species. The Fish House fossils also indicate that the northern Atlantic Slope fauna did not result from simple processes of dispersal from an ancient center of origin in the south, that one of the northern Atlantic Slope species is relictual in distribution, and that unionids, in contrast to marine bivalves and mammals, did not suffer extinctions during the Wisconsinan glaciation, but only underwent reductions in geographic ranges.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101