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A Forgotten Forum: The Forum Quarterly and the Development of West Indian Literature

C. WADE
Caribbean Quarterly
Vol. 50, No. 3 (September 2004), pp. 63-73
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40654465
Page Count: 11
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A Forgotten Forum: The Forum Quarterly and the Development of West Indian Literature
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Abstract

Today the West Indian novel is an internationally recognized literary phenomenon, and we speak without hesitation of a West Indian literature. But over sixty years ago, when Bim first appeared neither phenomenon had any recognizable existence. Edward Baugh's appropriately qualified assessment of Bim's role in the evolution of West Indian literature (1966) provides a context within which to examine the place and importance of Bim's antecedents in preparing the groundwork for the region's most influential and enduring literary magazine, and ultimately, for the development of West Indian literature itself. While the achievements of the Trinidadian little magazines have been comprehensively documented by Sander (1978,1988), there has been scant acknowledgement of the contribution of Bim's pioneering Barbadian counterparts - chiefly The Forum Quarterly launched in 1931 - without whose example those successes for Frank Collymore's journal would have been considerably less assured.

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