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The Redness of Blackness: Revisiting Derek Walcott's Mulatto Aesthetics

OMOTAYO OLORUNTOBA-OJU
Caribbean Quarterly
Vol. 52, No. 1 (March 2006), pp. 12-25
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40654532
Page Count: 14
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The Redness of Blackness: Revisiting Derek Walcott's Mulatto Aesthetics
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Abstract

The complex demands of history constitute a burden for the conscious Caribbean artist, particularly the playwright, who has to recreate Caribbean history and contemporary existence and expectation on a live stage. This paper is a review of Derek Walcott's mulatto aesthetics as a conscious choice that merges into this socio-historical backdrop. The paper recaps important stages in the development of Caribbean aesthetics and re-locates Walcott's critical and theatrical intervention within the continuum, not necessarily as "a tree that constitutes a forest" but as one whose central location continually defines a view of the forest. Nevertheless, the paper also questions Walcott's apparent repudiation of a full black aesthetics and the implication of this for a comprehensive definition of Caribbean aesthetics.

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