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THE USE AND PROCESSING OF PLANTS BY INDIANS OF SPANISH FLORIDA

John H. Hann
Southeastern Archaeology
Vol. 5, No. 2 (Winter 1986), pp. 91-102
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40656485
Page Count: 12
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THE USE AND PROCESSING OF PLANTS BY INDIANS OF SPANISH FLORIDA
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Abstract

This study presents data from sixteenth- and seventeenthcentury Spanish Florida on the natives' use and processing of plants, focusing on species other than maize, beans, and squash (although some mention is made of maize). The information is drawn largely from unpublished sources and published Spanish sources that are not well known. These data have direct implications for archaeologists at they provide descriptions of the burial of acorn meal in pits; the steps in the processing of an aquatic root used for bread; references to several types of vessels used in the toasting, brewing, storage, and consumption of cacina; and indications of Indian exploitation of wild-food resources even in uninhabited areas. At the very least these historical sources provide details on the use and processing of plants that cannot be reconstructed from archaeological data alone.

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