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PROBLÈME POSÉ PAR L'AMÉNAGEMENT DES POSTES DE TRAVAIL : les règles d'économie des mouvements

S. Bouisset
Le Travail Humain
Vol. 25, No. 3/4 (JUILLET-DÉCEMBRE 1962), pp. 281-304
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40659272
Page Count: 24
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PROBLÈME POSÉ PAR L'AMÉNAGEMENT DES POSTES DE TRAVAIL : les règles d'économie des mouvements
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Abstract

1. The arrangement of working spaces is made by Time and Motion Study Engineers who take into account a set of rules of motion economy to which an arbitral value is recognized. These rules, which were worked out some fifty years ago in an empirical way, then modified and corrected, call for scientific validations. 2. Some problems concerning the layout of the work bench — which are taken into consideration in rule number 10 of Barnes, handbook (1953) — are more specially discussed. Known experiments on which prescriptions concerning motion amplitude and direction rely seem fragmentary and not very convincing. Rather than the competence of American specialists, whose understanding of industrial problems is quite remarkable, the experimental designs and criteria used are questioned. Several recent ergonomic studies on the same variables have been examined. Their results, though still limited, lead to a more precise definition of the notion of normal working area, and stress the determining role of proprioceptive control in motions which do not include « Grasp » or « Position ». A new formulation of Barnes* rule number 10 (1953) is offered. 3. The need for new criteria for the rationalization of work, owing to limitations in Scientific Work Organization classical methods, and to the evolution of forms of industrial work, make actual ergonomic studies just as necessary as GilbretKs studies were at the beginning of the century. They permit specifying the validity of their prescriptions and specially setting the limits of motion economy rules.

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