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High-Velocity Flow in the Central Part of the Highly Evolved Planetary Nebula Abell 30

Yasushi Yadoumaru and Shin'ichi Tamura
Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
Vol. 106, No. 696 (1994 February), pp. 165-169
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40680263
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
High-Velocity Flow in the Central Part of the Highly Evolved Planetary Nebula Abell 30
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Abstract

We obtained a high-dispersion [O iii] λ5007 spectrum of the highly evolved planetary nebula, Abell 30 (PK 208 + 33°1= IRAS 08440+ 1803). We found a high-velocity component in the profile, whose expansion velocity is derived from its full width at half maximum, 166 km s⁻¹, and from the full width at zero intensity, VFWZI ≃ 450 km s⁻¹, in addition to the two velocity components from the previously identified knots. Moreover, from the position of the broad component, we determined the systemic velocity as Vsys = 13 km s⁻¹ in the frame of the Local Standard of Rest. These narrow components are attributed to J2 and J3-H4 identified by Jacoby (1979, PASP, 91, 754) and Hazard et al. (1980, Nature, 285, 463). Because Abell 30 is famous as a hydrogen-deficient planetary nebula, we suggest that its central star, having already shed its hydrogen envelope to expose the helium core, is now shedding its helium envelope. Abell 30 is, therefore, considered to have experienced the secondary ejection phase. Moreover the evidence of the existence of the fast stellar wind suggests that there is a dramatic effect on the material around the central star. We briefly discuss the origin of such a high-velocity flow.

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