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Der Enzyklopädiegedanke bei Comenius und Alsted, seine Übernahme und Umgestaltung bei Leibniz -neue Perspektiven der Leibnizforschung

KONRAD MOLL
Studia Leibnitiana
Bd. 34, H. 1 (2002), pp. 1-30
Published by: Franz Steiner Verlag
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40694405
Page Count: 30
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Der Enzyklopädiegedanke bei Comenius und Alsted, seine Übernahme und Umgestaltung bei Leibniz -neue Perspektiven der Leibnizforschung
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Abstract

The publication of so many of Leibniz's secret philosophical papers in Volume 4, Series VI, of the Academy Edition -in our days „the most important event in Leibniz scholarship" (G. H. R. Parkinson) -leads us to a new stage in Leibniz research. Undoubtedly the ingenious introductory essay of the editor Heinrich Schepers will challenge Leibniz scholars to investigate exactly Leibniz's way from his (formerly mostly hidden) fundamental thoughts of the years 1677-1690 to terminology and meaning of his late writings, and especially their encyclopaedian focus (No. 6). Leibniz strove to complete and update the Herborn Pansophism of Johann Heinrich Alsted. We get also new insight into the coherence of Leibniz's central topics as e. g. the reconciliation of traditional and modern concepts of science and philosophy. Both Alsted and Johann Amos Comenius and their idea of 'Panharmonia' and 'Panarithmicon' (No. 4) as well as their religious motives (laus Dei et felicitas seu beatitudo hominis, No. 3) inspired Leibniz to elaborate the Scientia Generalis, focused in the archetypical harmony of a cosmical world (No. 2). Attention is also given to the important heritage of Leibniz, leading to a religious character of enlightenment in Germany (No. 1 and No. 6).

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