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FABRIKSPARKASSEN FÜR ARBEITER - KONZEPTION UND INANSPRUCHNAHME EINER BETRIEBLICHEN INSTITUTION

Günther Schulz
Zeitschrift für Unternehmensgeschichte / Journal of Business History
25. Jahrg., H. 3. (1980), pp. 145-178
Published by: Verlag C.H.Beck
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40694707
Page Count: 34
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FABRIKSPARKASSEN FÜR ARBEITER - KONZEPTION UND INANSPRUCHNAHME EINER BETRIEBLICHEN INSTITUTION
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Abstract

The establishment of factory savings-banks for blue collar workers in Germany during the nineteenth century was part of the extensive educational attitude of social reformers, entrepreneurs and the government, which, by these means, tried to relieve distress and poverty of the workers and to incorporate them culturally. Since public savings-banks had not yet been founded in great numbers and their organisation was quite inconvenient for workers, the factory savings-banks covered up some déficiences. Though opposed by the workers' unions and workers who felt to be kept in a minor and dependent state by the latter institutions, many industrial enterprises were successful in developing their banks by means of high interest payments or premiums. The major aims were to strengthen an affirmative attitude of workers towards private property as well as towards the employers and to improve human relations. Minor aims were the prevention of strikes, unions' and social democrats' activities. The figures exposed in this study indicate that in the first place constant, settled workers made use of the factory savings-banks. The amounts of individual savings showed great variety depending, besides other factors, on the worker's stage of life. Average savings could not protect against structural risks like permanent illness or invalidism, but were fit to cover up brief times of distress like transient illness or unemployment. — The German factory savings-banks were abolished by the national-socialists in 1940.

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