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LEGISLATION, LEGACY, AND LARSON: LEWIS H. LARSON, GEORGIA'S FIRST STATE ARCHAEOLOGIST

Thomas Hales Eubanks
Southeastern Archaeology
Vol. 23, No. 2 (Winter 2004), pp. 214-218
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40713324
Page Count: 5
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LEGISLATION, LEGACY, AND LARSON: LEWIS H. LARSON, GEORGIA'S FIRST STATE ARCHAEOLOGIST
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Abstract

In 1972, when Lewis H. Larson, Jr. was appointed Georgia's first state archaeologist, state historic preservation programs were struggling to combine state duties with the new mandates of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). As state archaeologist, Larson was the senior advisor in matters involving archaeology in state government. Only one year after Larson's appointment, Governor Jimmy Carter reorganized state government and followed Larson's advice to transfer the Historical Commission's functions to the new Department of Natural Resources. This paper reviews those times, the subsequent development of the Office of State Archaeologist at West Georgia College, and Larson's role in assuring that archaeology was considered in every facet of the Georgia State Historic Preservation Program.

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