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BURNING AND BURYING BUILDINGS: EXPLORING VARIATION IN CADDO ARCHITECTURE IN SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

Mary Beth Trubitt
Southeastern Archaeology
Vol. 28, No. 2 (Winter 2009), pp. 233-247
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40713521
Page Count: 15
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BURNING AND BURYING BUILDINGS: EXPLORING VARIATION IN CADDO ARCHITECTURE IN SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS
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Abstract

Archaeological projects at the Caddo Valley (3CL593) and Hughes (3SA11) sites near the Caddo and Saline rivers in southwest Arkansas uncovered burned structures buried within and adjacent to mounds. The architecture at these two sites is compared with other excavated examples dating to the A. D. 1100s through early 1600s in the Middle Ouachita River, Little Missouri River, and Ouachita Mountains regions. The termination of important buildings through burning and intentional burying is contrasted with the abandonment of ordinary structures, and the meaning of the architectural variation is explored in terms of Caddo ritual and belief systems.

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